Video: Director Wray Addresses Shutdown Effects on FBI



Saved Stories - Trump Investigations 
“Christopher Wray” – Google News: Video: Director Wray Addresses Shutdown Effects on FBI Workforce – Lawfare
Lawfare - Hard National Security Choices: Video: Director Wray Addresses Shutdown Effects on FBI Workforce
Donald Trump | The Guardian: Roger Stone says he will not 'bear false witness' against Donald Trump – video
Politics: Poll: Majority of Americans hold Trump and Republicans responsible for shutdown
2:29 PM 1/25/2019 - Saved Stories - Trump Investigations Politics: Roger Stone was in close contact with Trump campaign about WikiLeaks, indictment shows Roger Stone indictment packed with details that may make Trump sweat trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/01/229-pm…
"trump criminal investigation" - Google News: Trump confidant Stone is arrested, says he's falsely accused - Maryville Daily Times
"trump as danger to National Security" - Google News: Trump's Middle East Policy Is All About His Base - LobeLog
FBI Arrests Roger Stone
“fbi scandal” – Google News: Mueller: “Get me Roger Stone” – AL DIA News
Donald Trump: Roger Stone indictment: Threats against man and dog
“fbi criticism” – Google News: Fitton: Judicial Watch Moves to Question Top Obama-Clinton Officials About Benghazi, Clinton Emails – Breitbart
Donald Trump: RNC Chief’s Message: Don’t Worry, Everything Is Fine
Lawfare - Hard National Security Choices: ‘Get Me Roger Stone’: What to Make of the ‘Dirty Trickster’s’ Indictment
Deutsche Bank's CEO vows to bring 'pride back,' finds support among Davos leaders - CNBC | Donald Trump: Trump Wanted His Disney Animatronic To Brag About His Skyscrapers, New Book Says trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/01/deutsc…
"social media in trump campaign" - Google News: Trump and Far-Right Movement Ignite War at Century-Old G.O.P. Club in Manhattan - New York Times
"trump and republican party" - Google News: Trump and Far-Right Movement Ignite War at Century-Old G.O.P. Club in Manhattan - New York Times
Donald Trump: Trump agrees deal to end US government shutdown
Key takeaways from Roger Stone's indictment in Russia probe - Associated Press
"trump authoritarianism" - Google News: Trump invokes Israel’s ‘wall’ in saying he has agreed to reopen government - Jewish Telegraphic Agency
"trump electorate" - Google News: What would it take for Trump to get a primary challenge in 2020? - Washington Post
Palmer Report: Donald Trump caves like an idiot on wall and shutdown after his world collapses
Just Security: Wither the Giuliani Defense of “No Crime of Collusion” in Wake of Roger Stone’s Indictment
Roger Stone speaks outside court after arrest in Mueller probe - YouTube
FBI arrests longtime Trump associate Roger Stone - YouTube
Deutsche Bank’s CEO vows to bring ‘pride back,’ finds support among Davos leaders

Saved Stories - Trump Investigations 
“Christopher Wray” – Google News: Video: Director Wray Addresses Shutdown Effects on FBI Workforce – Lawfare

Video: Director Wray Addresses Shutdown Effects on FBI Workforce  Lawfare
The FBI director commented Friday on the shutdown.
 “Christopher Wray” – Google News
Lawfare - Hard National Security Choices: Video: Director Wray Addresses Shutdown Effects on FBI Workforce

Amid an FBI Agents Association report and media accounts addressing the effects of the government shutdown on the FBI workforce and operations, FBI Director Christopher Wray released on Friday the following video addressing the shutdown and steps the bureau's leadership is taking to resolve it.
 


 Lawfare - Hard National Security Choices
Donald Trump | The Guardian: Roger Stone says he will not 'bear false witness' against Donald Trump – video

Roger Stone, a longtime ally of the US president, says he has been falsely accused of lying to the House intelligence committee and will plead not guilty to the charges filed against him. Stone told reporters outside Fort Lauderdale courthouse in Florida: 'There is no circumstance whatsoever under which I will bear false witness against the president, nor will I make up lies to ease the pressure on myself'
Continue reading...

 Donald Trump | The Guardian
Politics: Poll: Majority of Americans hold Trump and Republicans responsible for shutdown

The findings in a new Washington Post-ABC News survey illustrate the political damage the president and his party have suffered in his fight for partial border wall funding.







Politics
2:29 PM 1/25/2019 - Saved Stories - Trump Investigations Politics: Roger Stone was in close contact with Trump campaign about WikiLeaks, indictment shows Roger Stone indictment packed with details that may make Trump sweat trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/01/229-pm…

2:29 PM 1/25/2019 - Saved Stories - Trump Investigations Politics: Roger Stone was in close contact with Trump campaign about WikiLeaks, indictment shows Roger Stone indictment packed with details that may make Trump sweat trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/01/229-pm…

Posted by mikenov on Friday, January 25th, 2019 6:31pm
"trump criminal investigation" - Google News: Trump confidant Stone is arrested, says he's falsely accused - Maryville Daily Times

Trump confidant Stone is arrested, says he's falsely accused  Maryville Daily Times
WASHINGTON (AP) — Shouting "FBI, open the door," authorities arrested Roger Stone, a confidant of President Donald Trump, before dawn Friday in a criminal ...




 "trump criminal investigation" - Google News
"trump as danger to National Security" - Google News: Trump's Middle East Policy Is All About His Base - LobeLog

Trump's Middle East Policy Is All About His Base  LobeLog
by Seth Binder. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was expected to outline the Trump administration's grand strategy for the Middle East in his speech at the ...




 "trump as danger to National Security" - Google News
FBI Arrests Roger Stone

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from Russia – Mother Jones.

The FBI has arrested Roger Stone, the longtime adviser to President Donald Trump, as a part of special counsel Rober Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. He was charged with seven counts that include witness tampering, false statements, and obstruction of an official proceeding.
Stone is expected to make an appearance in federal court later on Friday.
You can read the indictment below:
This is a breaking news post. We will update as more information becomes available.
“fbi scandal” – Google News: Mueller: “Get me Roger Stone” – AL DIA News

Mueller: “Get me Roger Stone”  AL DIA News
President Trump’s friend and advisor was arrested on Friday on seven charges including obstruction, lying to Congress and witness tampering, under the …
 “fbi scandal” – Google News
Donald Trump: Roger Stone indictment: Threats against man and dog

Key points in indictment of longtime Trump adviser, arrested as part of Mueller probe

 Donald Trump
“fbi criticism” – Google News: Fitton: Judicial Watch Moves to Question Top Obama-Clinton Officials About Benghazi, Clinton Emails – Breitbart

Fitton: Judicial Watch Moves to Question Top Obama-Clinton Officials About Benghazi, Clinton Emails  Breitbart
State and Justice will not investigate themselves and we can’t expect more efforts in the House to examine Hillary Clinton’s behavior.
 “fbi criticism” – Google News
Donald Trump: RNC Chief’s Message: Don’t Worry, Everything Is Fine

Republicans lost 40 seats and control of the House, and the Russia investigation gets closer to Trump, but Ronna McDaniel had only good news for her party.



 Donald Trump
Lawfare - Hard National Security Choices: ‘Get Me Roger Stone’: What to Make of the ‘Dirty Trickster’s’ Indictment

The White House line throughout L’Affaire Russe has been that there was “NO COLLUSION” between the Trump campaign and Russia. Days before his inauguration, Donald Trump declared on Twitter, “I HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH RUSSIA - NO DEALS, NO LOANS, NO NOTHING!” In September 2018, he wrote, “Russian Collusion with the Trump Campaign, one of the most successful in history, is a TOTAL HOAX.”
Special Counsel Robert Mueller has never flatly announced that this broad public contention is a lie. He has, rather, meticulously chipped away at it—one indictment at a time, one plea agreement at a time—with the substance of successive prosecutorial actions. First, the court documents related to the plea of Trump campaign foreign policy aide George Papadopoulos were unsealed—telling the story of how Papadopoulos was told by an apparent Russian cutout that the Kremlin had “dirt” on Hillary Clinton in the form of “thousands of emails,” months before the DNC and Podesta emails were leaked to the public. Then came the plea of former Trump national security advisor Michael Flynn in December 2017 on charges of lying to investigators over, among other things, contacts during the presidential transition with Russian officials. Two months later, Mueller unspooled a detailed account of a systematic social media influence operation conducted by an entity owned by a friend of Vladimir Putin’s. In July 2018, Mueller’s office moved the story closer to the Kremlin itself, indicting 12 officials of the GRU, Russia’s military intelligence agency, for hacking and leaking emails from the Democratic National Committee and Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta. Most recently, in the case of one-time Trump attorney Michael Cohen, Mueller has asserted in court documents that the Trump Organization’s efforts to construct a Trump Tower Moscow went on well into the 2016 presidential campaign and detailed the contacts between Trump associates and Russian officials and cutouts on the matter.
Today, the special counsel brought the story inside the Trump campaign, alleging that Roger Stone longtime gadfly political operative had acted as a kind of back channel between the campaign and WikiLeaks—funneling information between Julian Assange and senior officials of the Trump campaign about forthcoming releases of purloined emails. No, this is not the smoking gun many have been waiting for. A lot of the information contained in the indictment has been in the press for a while—and in any event, the relationship it alleges between the campaign and the Russian government is a complicated, and somewhat attenuated, one. But if the Roger Stone indictment doesn’t quite allege “collusion” between the Trump campaign and the Russians, it unambiguously alleges—in the language of Robert Mueller’s appointment letter—“links and/or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with the campaign of President Donald Trump.” Specifically, the indictment alleges that Stone and WikiLeaks were together coordinating between the Russian government and the Trump campaign over the release of information that, by then, had been publicly reported by Crowdstrike and many press outlets to have been stolen by the Russian government.
Before turning to the big picture, let’s start with what Mueller has alleged against Stone.
The grand jury charges seven crimes. First, it charges Stone with one count of obstruction of a government proceeding, in violation of 18 U.S.C. §1505 and 18 U.S.C. §2, for allegedly giving false and misleading testimony to the House intelligence committee; for allegedly lying about the existence of and failing to produce records responsive to the committee’s requests; for allegedly submitting a letter containing false descriptions of communications with “Person 2” to the committee; and for allegedly attempting to suborn perjury or prevent testimony from “Person 2.” While the document leaves “Person 2” unidentified, he is clearly radio host Randy Credico (and the dog that Stone allegedly threatened to “take … away” from Credico is Credico’s therapy dog Bianca).
Second, the grand jury charges five counts of knowingly making false statements to the House intelligence committee in violation of 18 U.S.C. §1001(a)(2) and 18 U.S.C. §2. Specifically, the indictment alleges that Stone falsely claimed he “did not have emails with third parties about the head of Organization 1”—clearly, from context, WikiLeaks—“and that he did not have any documents, emails, or text messages that refer to [WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange],” whereas in fact he had “sent and received numerous emails and text messages during the 2016 campaign.” The indictment further alleges that Stone testified falsely when he said that his “August 2016 references to being in contact with [Assange] were references to communications” only with Randy Credico; in reality, Stone was allegedly also using “Person 1” as a second intermediary. (Political commentator Jerome Corsi has identified himself as Person 1.) Mueller also alleges that Stone lied when he testified that he did not ask Credico to communicate with Assange or do anything else, when he had, in fact, done so. He claims that Stone made false statements in saying that he did not communicate with Credico “via text message or email about [WikiLeaks],” and when he said that he “had never discussed his conversations” with Credico “with anyone involved in the Trump Campaign.”
The more factually novel aspect of the indictment is what it says about Stone’s interactions with the Trump campaign and his service as an intermediary between the campaign and WikiLeaks—a role of which Stone has sometimes boasted.
The indictment alleges that Stone directed Corsi to “Get to [Assange]” in London, and that Corsi informed Stone about the planned timing of WikiLeaks releases. Corsi responded to Stone’s request by informing him that “Word is friend in embassy plans 2 more dumps. One shortly after I’m back. 2nd in Oct. Impact planned to be very damaging.” On multiple occasions throughout August, Stone stated publicly to reporters and at a public event that he gained this information in communications with Assange—a claim he has subsequently denied. In his House testimony, Stone allegedly falsely claimed that Credico, his other envoy to Assange, was his only intermediary.
The indictment also clearly alleges that Stone himself engaged the campaign over the coming email releases, though the document is cagey as to the identity of those on the Trump campaign who received it. Stone, the government writes, was “contacted by senior Trump Campaign officials” in the summer of 2016 regarding possible future releases by WikiLeaks. Following the first release of emails hacked from the DNC on July 22, 2016, “a senior Trump Campaign official was directed to contact STONE about any additional releases and what other damaging information [WikiLeaks] had regarding the Clinton Campaign. STONE thereafter told the Trump Campaign about potential future releases of damaging material by [WikiLeaks].”
It is not clear who this “senior Trump Campaign official” is, or who may have directed that official to contact Stone. It is also not clear who the “senior Trump Campaign officials” were who contacted Stone. Responding to Stone’s indictment, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said, “This has nothing to do with the president and certainly nothing to do with the White House.”
The document also alleges communications between Stone and a “high-ranking Trump Campaign official”—probably a different person—whom the government alleges wrote Stone a message reading, “well done,” following the initial release of emails hacked from Podesta on Oct. 7. The identity of that “high-ranking” campaign official is no secret: at least if one believes the New York Times, it’s Steve Bannon, Trump’s former campaign chief executive. This has been public since Nov. 1, 2018, when the Times published emails between Stone, Bannon, and Breitbart News editor Matthew Boyle. (Following Stone’s arrest, CNBC has confirmed that Bannon is the campaign official referenced in this section of the indictment.)
Stone’s role as a potential conduit of information from WikiLeaks to the campaign is not entirely new. The Times reported in November 2018 that “three senior Trump campaign officials have told Mr. Mueller’s team that Mr. Stone created the impression that he was a conduit for inside information from WikiLeaks” and that one “told investigators that Mr. Stone not only seemed to predict WikiLeaks’ actions, but also that he took credit afterward for the timing of its disclosures that damaged Hillary Clinton’s candidacy.”
Also interestingly, the indictment suggests that Stone and his intermediaries were communicating about true information later revealed in the WikiLeaks dumps before that material became publicly available. In particular, on Aug. 2, Corsi allegedly wrote to Stone, “Time to let more than [the Clinton Campaign chairman] to be exposed as in bed w enemy if they are not ready to drop HRC.”
Because of the flurry of leaks and reporting surrounding this issue, a lot of the specific facts alleged in the indictment are not new. Corsi took the ill-advised step of leaking draft documents related to his aborted plea negotiations with the special counsel’s office. In the draft Statement of the Offense, the government describes many of the same communications as are now included in the Stone indictment. And there has been other reporting regarding Stone’s possible communications with Wikileaks directly and through intermediaries on the topic of hacked emails, his outreach to Guccifer 2.0, and his communication with Trump campaign officials and the president himself.
But there is a big difference between facts that appear in media reports and those same facts when alleged by Mueller’s team as statements it is prepared to prove in court beyond a reasonable doubt. There’s also a difference, albeit a smaller one, between material included in draft documents and material in a document that the special prosecutor has actually signed and submitted to a court.
As a general matter, Mueller has been quite deliberative and intentional about what he chooses to include in public documents—and what he doesn’t include. A number of indictments out of the special counsel’s office have clearly been intended as “speaking indictments,” designed not merely to make allegations sufficient to support a charge in court but also to communicate information to the public about what happened. The Stone indictment has elements of this. At one level, the filing offers important pieces not just of the specific Roger Stone story but also of the larger story of Russian interference in the 2016 election and the Trump campaign’s engagement with that effort.
But as with previous Mueller actions, there are also pieces that are conspicuously missing. Most significantly, this document does not reveal the full nature of the alleged backchannel from Stone to Julian Assange or to WikiLeaks. It makes clear that there were efforts by Stone and others, including Trump campaign officials, to obtain information from Wikileaks regarding the contents of hacked materials and Assange’s plans to leak those materials. It also makes clear that the campaign in fact learned some nonpublic information in advance that turned out to be accurate. But it leaves many important questions unanswered: Was a connection between Assange and Stone the only means through which WikiLeaks coordinated the release of information with the Trump campaign? Was Stone’s activity in material respects limited to the actions described in this document? Or is this the tip of a much larger iceberg regarding coordination on email release and other matters?
Finally, it’s worth addressing a line of argument raised by the president and his supporters in response to the indictment of Stone. The president’s response to developments in the Mueller probe has typically been to minimize his own connection with the news and point an accusatory finger at both the special counsel’s office and the media, and this time is no different: Trump and some media figures have questioned how CNN came to have cameras at Stone’s house at the time of his arrest. “Who alerted CNN to be there?” the president asked, clearly implying that someone had leaked that the arrest was happening. And in the same tweet, he complained about the manner in which law enforcement dealt with Stone: “Border Coyotes, Drug Dealers and Human Traffickers are treated better.”
This suggestion has gathered steam in pro-Trump media in the hours since Stone’s arrest. But in fact, it’s no secret why Mueller’s team decided to execute an early morning raid, rather than allow Stone to surrender himself to authorities. The special counsel’s office made this very clear in its motion to seal the indictment and related warrants and motions, filed the day before Stone’s arrest:
Law enforcement believes that publicity resulting from disclosure of the Indictment and related materials on the public record prior to arrest will increase the risk of the defendant fleeing and destroying (or tampering with) evidence. It is therefore essential that any information concerning the pending indictment in this district be kept sealed prior to the defendant’s arrest.
In such circumstances, the treatment of Stone is quite normal: arrests are often made by the FBI, and warrants are generally executed, in early-morning hours as a matter of standard operating procedures.
Trump’s suggestion that law enforcement leaked the coming raid also seems wholly unlikely. Law enforcement tends to take the secrecy surrounding raids extremely seriously; a leak risks compromising an investigation in the precise way Mueller’s filing suggests, not to mention potentially placing FBI agents in physical danger. More importantly, CNN has offered a detailed explanation of how its reporters obtained the story, saying reporters had been “staking out Stone because there was just enough evidence lurking in the special counsel's activity over the past week that CNN's team covering the Mueller investigation placed a bet that Stone could be arrested as early as Friday.” According to CNN, the first hints were provided when a Mueller’s team told a grand jury witness to select a day for testimony other than Friday—an indication the special counsel’s office anticipated being busy. Then the grand jury was set to meet Thursday, instead of on the usual Friday. CNN reporters then observed Mueller’s prosecutors in the courthouse meeting with the grand jury and later saw one of those prosecutors wheeling a suitcase, suggesting plans to travel. CNN decided to send a team to stake out Stone’s house in case an arrest was imminent. In other words, this does not appear to have been a leak it all—just good reporting leading to a scoop.
Stone has staked out belligerent, public ground on the subject of the Mueller probe. The persona featured in the movie Get Me Roger Stone did not make his reputation as a self-described “dirty trickster” by cooperating with law enforcement, but by draping himself in Watergate and tattooing the face Richard Nixon on his back. But when anyone is facing multiple felony charges in a high-stakes investigation—irrespective of the pose he might adopt of loyalty or wronged innocence or confrontation with prosecutors—the key question is whether and under what circumstances he ends up in a cooperative posture with investigators and tells them what he knows. Notwithstanding whatever Stone may be saying today, that is still the right question to keep in mind as his prosecution moves forward.


 Lawfare - Hard National Security Choices
Deutsche Bank's CEO vows to bring 'pride back,' finds support among Davos leaders - CNBC | Donald Trump: Trump Wanted His Disney Animatronic To Brag About His Skyscrapers, New Book Says trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/01/deutsc…

Deutsche Bank's CEO vows to bring 'pride back,' finds support among Davos leaders - CNBC | Donald Trump: Trump Wanted His Disney Animatronic To Brag About His Skyscrapers, New Book Says trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/01/deutsc…

Posted by mikenov on Friday, January 25th, 2019 7:11pm
"social media in trump campaign" - Google News: Trump and Far-Right Movement Ignite War at Century-Old G.O.P. Club in Manhattan - New York Times

Trump and Far-Right Movement Ignite War at Century-Old G.O.P. Club in Manhattan  New York Times
Republican factions are fighting for control of a political club whose invitation of the Proud Boys, a far-right group, ended in a street brawl.




 "social media in trump campaign" - Google News
"trump and republican party" - Google News: Trump and Far-Right Movement Ignite War at Century-Old G.O.P. Club in Manhattan - New York Times

Trump and Far-Right Movement Ignite War at Century-Old G.O.P. Club in Manhattan  New York Times
Republican factions are fighting for control of a political club whose invitation of the Proud Boys, a far-right group, ended in a street brawl.


 "trump and republican party" - Google News
Donald Trump: Trump agrees deal to end US government shutdown

President says he will sign measure to open government for three weeks

 Donald Trump
Key takeaways from Roger Stone's indictment in Russia probe - Associated Press

Key takeaways from Roger Stone's indictment in Russia probe  Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Russia investigation snared another associate of President Donald Trump with the arrest Friday of self-described political "dirty ...


"trump authoritarianism" - Google News: Trump invokes Israel’s ‘wall’ in saying he has agreed to reopen government - Jewish Telegraphic Agency

Trump invokes Israel’s ‘wall’ in saying he has agreed to reopen government  Jewish Telegraphic Agency
(JTA) — Announcing that he has agreed to end the partial government shutdown for three weeks, President Donald Trump invoked Israel's security barrier in ...


 "trump authoritarianism" - Google News
"trump electorate" - Google News: What would it take for Trump to get a primary challenge in 2020? - Washington Post

What would it take for Trump to get a primary challenge in 2020?  Washington Post
If he can't rebound in the polls, it will become more likely.


 "trump electorate" - Google News
Palmer Report: Donald Trump caves like an idiot on wall and shutdown after his world collapses


When Special Counsel Robert Mueller had the FBI arrest Roger Stone this morning, it became clear that Donald Trump was going to have to change the subject. When the FAA began shutting down New York’s LaGuardia airport out of necessity a few hours later, it became clear that Trump was going to have to end his government shutdown today. Sure enough, he caved in swift and stunning, if predictably incoherent, fashion.
 


Donald Trump gave a long and rambling speech in the White House Rose Garden today. Most of it was varying degrees of unintelligible. But the only part you need to know is this: Trump agreed to reopen the federal government for three weeks, without any funding at all for his border wall. This was precisely what Trump said he’d never do. So what happens in three weeks?
 


In short, nothing. Trump kept hinting during his speech that he’ll magically declare a national emergency in three weeks and build his wall that way, but that’s always been an empty, laughable threat. Trump’s speech made it fairly clear that he was protesting too much, and that he’s done with this shutdown business entirely. Three weeks from now, the public and the media will have moved on from focusing on the shutdown and the wall, and he can then quietly sign a new budget without any wall funding.
 
The bad news for Donald Trump is that three weeks from now, the primary focus of the nation will likely be on who all else gets arrested between now and then. The wording of the Roger Stone indictment strongly suggests that his arrest is a precursor to far bigger moves coming soon on the part of Robert Mueller.




 Palmer Report
Just Security: Wither the Giuliani Defense of “No Crime of Collusion” in Wake of Roger Stone’s Indictment

The Roger Stone indictment should be considered in light of the many recent statements that the president’s counsel, Rudy Giuliani, tossed out in recent weeks. Giuliani insisted on the narrowest possible definition of “collusion,” excluding anything other than Donald Trump or his campaign’s direct involvement in the conspiracy to hack the DNC or the Clinton campaign’s chair emails. On Friday morning in the wake of Stone’s indictment, White House press Secretary Sarah Sanders asserted, “The question and the big thing that the Mueller investigation is supposed to center on is whether or not the President in some outrageous way colluded with Russia.” By now the president’s lawyers must believe they have a fairly good sense of his exposure on the facts of the case. Their position seems to have shifted from “no collusion,” to “no crime of collusion,” and they have tried to redirect the focus away from whether a host of campaign members colluded. Their hope may be that the Trump campaign-Wikileaks-Russia alliance is so extraordinary and unprecedented that the law cannot clearly reach it.
The Stone indictment now shows that over a number of months the Trump campaign used Stone as an intermediary—more precisely, its agent— to solicit information from WikiLeaks, a partner of Russia in a conspiracy to influence a federal election. Stone did not have to chase the campaign; the campaign reached out to him launching that initiative after it became privately known by the campaign and publicly known that Russia was behind the hacked material that Wikileaks possessed and was preparing to release in increments. In fact, the campaign appears to have knocked on Stone’s door immediately after Wikileaks’ release of the first tranche of Democratic National Committee emails in July 2016. The indictment alleges that “After the July 22, 2016 release of stolen DNC emails by Organization 1, a senior campaign official was directed to contact STONE about any additional releases and what other damaging information organization number one had regarding the Clinton campaign.”
The campaign cannot credibly argue that it did not derive value from this association. The information that the campaign thirsted to acquire with Stone’s help was central to the design of its attack on Hillary Clinton. The new indictment shows that this was a priority in the higher echelons of the campaign: that someone “directed” a senior campaign official to urge Stone in the summer of 2016 to find out what he could about future WikiLeaks releases.
We can add to this active use of a direct, covert contact to the facts already unearthed about the Trump campaign’s solicitation and encouragement of the support from the Russian government, with WikiLeaks (also a foreign national) acting as a full partner in this political “mutual aid” pact. The federal campaign finance laws prohibit foreign nationals from influencing elections – – and Americans from substantially assisting them in that illegal endeavor. The American participation is also subject to prosecution as a conspiracy to defraud the United States, which was a statutory basis for the special counsel’s indictment of Russian parties. Under these laws, the Trump campaign is clearly exposed, as an entity, along with those of its personnel who directed these activities.
It is not irrelevant to the overall judgment of whether a legal violation occurred that the campaign sent other signals to the Russian government that it was in the market for this help. After a Russian agent, in April 2016, told Trump campaign adviser George Papadopoulos of “Moscow possessing ‘dirt’” on Hillary Clinton “in the form of ‘thousands of emails,’” the campaign green-lighted Papadopoulos’ setting up a back channel meeting between the campaign and Russian officials. At Trump Tower in June of 2016, the campaign’s senior management met with Kremlin emissaries. And in July 2016, the president publicly called on the Russians to locate missing emails within the very same week the campaign reached out to Stone. The president made that statement even as he was ostensibly reserving judgment on whether the Putin regime was responsible for the hacks. He also went out of his way to declare his “love” of Wikileaks.
The indictment contains allegations that the Trump campaign was not merely cheering on Wikileaks and the Russians. On at least one occasion, Stone allegedly asked for specific material on Clinton, with specific date ranges. Did someone on the campaign ask Stone to check for this information? Who would have thought to look for it? The indictment does not say. But we also know that Stone’s intermediary proposed, and the campaign adopted, a line of attack on Clinton’s health, based on information that they believed would be supported by emails that had not yet been released.
Now the campaign is preparing to argue that so long as the information had already been stolen, it was perfectly free to conduct a strategic communications with a foreign government and its agents to acquire information about the emails or to influence the timing of the release. The campaign lawyers will likely say that the material was nothing of “value” for campaign finance law purposes, and that in any event, the First Amendment protects its receipt and use of the information.
We face, in other words, the fairly exceptional development that a presidential campaign claims a constitutional right to encourage foreign nationals to traffic in stolen information for its political benefit. Without a doubt this is a case of first impression. At the same time, as the evidence continues to develop, Mr. Giuliani’s hope of escaping with a truly technical defense, buttressed by a sweeping constitutional claim, could still come to ruin.
Attention will soon turn to what the special counsel has learned about the Trump Tower meeting in June 2016. Then the campaign clearly communicated to Russia that it was looking for its help. The president’s son arranged a meeting, and his campaign chairman and senior campaign official Jared Kushner, attended it. The president said he knew nothing about it, and of course, his and his associates’ story about what transpired in the meeting has constantly changed.
But the more that details accumulate about the extent to which this campaign would march with Russia arm-in-arm to victory in the general election, the more uncertain are the prospects for Mr. Giuliani’s claim that even if there was collusion, there was no crime. Gone are the days where “no collusion” could be voiced. We are now down to the question of whether crimes were committed and will be charged..
Photo: Roger Stone exits the federal courthouse on January 25, 2019 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)


 Just Security
Roger Stone speaks outside court after arrest in Mueller probe - YouTube

Roger Stone speaks outside court after arrest in Mueller probe
FBI arrests longtime Trump associate Roger Stone - YouTube

FBI arrests longtime Trump associate Roger Stone
Deutsche Bank’s CEO vows to bring ‘pride back,’ finds support among Davos leaders

Ralph Orlowski | Bloomberg via Getty Images
Deutsche Bank, the embattled German lender, has found some support among leaders gathered at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos.
In the past few years, the bank has made headlines for all the wrong reasons — from settlements with the U.S. Department of Justice, to management reshuffles, weak earnings, constant restructuring, merger speculation and steep stock price falls.
Nonetheless, business and political leaders at Davos have thrown in their support for the bank’s recovery path.
“Deutsche Bank ... suffered some setbacks in the past, but it is basically sound and it can recover and so the question is what are the details of such strategy. And as we discussed with the CEO and the board and all the people concerned, I trust in Deutsche Bank and I will lend my political support to Deutsche Bank,” Peter Altmaier, the German minister for economic affairs and energy, told CNBC earlier this week.
close dialog
European banks are increasingly under pressure to get a strategy in place to deal with an uncertain and fast-changing environment. Interest rates are still at record lows and there’s uncertainty around Brexit, along with fears of a global slowdown.
VIDEO03:01
Barclays CEO: Deutsche Bank’s new boss doing the right thing
Praising Deutsche Bank CEO Christian Sewing’s efforts in his turnaround plans, Barclays CEO Jes Staley said he’s doing the right thing.
“I know Christian. I think he is doing the right things. I think he is a very talented executive,” Staley said.
“I think they have recapitalized the bank, they are moving the bank towards profitability and as Christian has said, let’s get Deutsche organized and, in the right place, and then let us think about what other options there might be,” he added.
Sewing took the helm in April 2018 after replacing John Cryan, the bank’s leader for nearly three years. Speaking to German weekly publication Die Zeit on the sidelines of WEF, Sewing said he wants to make Deutsche Bank a place that lives up to his standards.
“I want to get my job right, I want to have the right values and I want to have the passion in this bank like before; we need to bring pride back to Deutsche Bank.”
Christian Sewing, the new CEO of Deutsche Bank, speaks at the Deutsche Bank annual shareholders’ meeting on May 24, 2018 in Frankfurt, Germany. Shareholders, frustrated by years of poor performance by Deutsche Bank, are calling for Achleitner to step down.
Thomas Lohnes | Getty Images
 –
German Intelligence Chief Wilhelm Franz Canaris – The Operation Trump and The New Abwehr: A Study In Psychohistory by Michael Novakhov – Google Search

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from Trump Investigations.

 

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The Operation Trump and The New Abwehr: A Study In Psychohistory by Michael Novakhov – Google Search

Michael_Novakhov shared this story .
>> Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks Review In Brief 
» German Intelligence Chief Wilhelm Franz Canaris
24/01/19 06:17 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story from Warfare History Network. Adolf Hitler’s spymaster, Admiral Wilhelm Canaris, was actually a dedicated anti-Nazi who did everything he could to frustrate the Führer’s plans. by David…
» Canaris and Heydrich – Axis History Forum
24/01/19 06:16 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story . Canaris and Heydrich #1 Post by Ezboard » 29 Sep 2002, 21:37 GFM2001 Member Posts: 55 (8/20/01 12:32:55 pm) Reply Canaris and Heydrich ————————————————————…
» Canaris – Heydrich Gay Love Affair – Google Search
24/01/19 05:53 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .
» Canaris – Heydrich Gay Love Affair – Google Search
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Michael_Novakhov shared this story .
» Canaris – Heydrich Gay Love Affair – Google Search
24/01/19 05:50 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .
» Canaris – Heydrich Gay Love Affair – Google Search
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Michael_Novakhov shared this story .
» Canaris – Heydrich Gay Love Affair – Google Search
24/01/19 05:47 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .
» Canaris – Heydrich Gay Love Affair – Google Search
24/01/19 05:46 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .
» Canaris – Heydrich Gay Love Affair – Google Search
24/01/19 05:45 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .
» Canaris – Heydrich Gay Love Affair – Google Search
24/01/19 05:45 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .
» Service record of Reinhard Heydrich
24/01/19 05:43 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story . SS- service record cover of Obergruppenführer und General der Polizei Reinhard Heydrich The service record of Reinhard Heydrich was a collection of official SS documents maintained at the SS Pers…
» RUSSIA and THE WEST – РОССИЯ и ЗАПАД: – Командир, ручка от жопы отваливается! | – Ништяк, а мы её стразами укрепим! – 6:10 AM 1/7/2019
24/01/19 05:26 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story from RUSSIA and THE WEST – РОССИЯ и ЗАПАД. Monday, January 7, 2019 – Командир, ручка от жоп…
» 1:55 PM 9/5/2018 – Canaris’ love affair with Reinhard Heydrich, both of whom were at least in part Jewish and Gay… | The Global Security News
24/01/19 05:12 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The Global Security News. Upon the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party in Germany, gay men and, to a lesser extent, lesbians, were two of the numerous groups targeted by the Nazis and were ulti…
» Heydrich’s homosexuality? – Axis History Forum
24/01/19 04:52 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story . Heydrich’s homosexuality? #1 Post by Ezboard » 29 Sep 2002, 19:03 HannahR New Member Posts: 1 (5/26/01 5:43:01 pm) Reply Heydrich’s homosexuality? ————————————————…
» Canaris – Heydrich Gay Love Affair as the source and the engine of German Fascism of 1930-1940-s – Psychohistorical Hypothesis by Michael Novakhov
24/01/19 04:15 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story from Trump Investigations. Canaris – Heydrich Gay Love Affair as the source and the engine of the German Fascism of 1930-1940-s  Psychohistorical Hypothesis by Michael Novakhov 9:19 AM 9/21/20…
» 9:19 AM 9/21/2018 – (Abwehr? Drag?) Queens (Are?) Flushing (With Rage? Shame? Anger? Angst? All of the above? None of the above?) | The Global Security News
24/01/19 03:56 from Mike Nova’s Shared Newslinks
Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The Global Security News. Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks Drag Bang Drag, Gala de Eleccion Drag Queen 2015 LPGC – YouTube   mikenova  shared this story  . Drag Bang Drag, Ga…

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